HILLMAN CAR CLUB
OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC

Tech Tips:  Fuel Tank Cleaning
HILLMAN CAR CLUB
OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC



From: Edward Meadowcroft [edward(at)caton55.fsnet.co.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 4:44 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [HillmanCars] advice

Hi All,

Just got my 1952 Standard Vanguard started after a 15 year slumber.  It started quite easily on a carb. full of new fuel.  As soon as that fuel had gone it quit so I figured that 15 year old gas was definitely no good. 
I tried blowing back down the fuel line to the tank but it is completely plugged up so I guess I will have to take the pipe off the tank to see if it is just the pipe or gummed up fuel in the tank in which case I will have to take that off too. 
Question .... how do you get gummed fuel out of the tank? Is there any solvent that will dissolve it?  Any advice from someone who has dealt with this problem would be appreciated.
Ed



From: Chuck Hillman [hillmanminx(at)hermon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 5:20 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

Hi Ed,

    Glad you have a new project.  I'd see if the tank has lots of black tar in it that used to be fuel.  If it does you may want to have it hot tanked at a radiator shop.  I've tried lacquer thinner, carb cleaner etc without much success.  I'm sure there is something evil that works, but I don't know what it is.
cheers,
Chuck



From: Roger Foote [humbers(at)bigpond.net.au]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 7:41 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

Hi Ed,
    I have successfully use a broken inner speedo cable (with burred end) to "drill" out the gunk in a fuel line.  Might be worth a try.
    Regards,
    Roger.

From: Kenneth Nelson [citbuff(at)sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 9:04 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

There are lots of radiator shops around who can "boil out" a gastank for about $100.  They use a hot tank process which will do a pretty good job of cleaning out old gunk and some rust from an ancient tank.  I had a '61 Citroen DS tank done here in Redwood City Ca for $89.00  Perfect job, & still going strong 3 yrs later.

Ken



From: Keith Johnson [keiths55(at)bigpond.net.au]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 5:18 PM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

Hi Ed

My 56 Minx had been sitting since 1979 with similar results.
I found the fuel line was clear.  I put a length of plastic fuel line on the end after disconnecting it from the tank and hung that in a 1 gallon fuel container.  It sucked fuel out of that OK.
The fuel tank was more of a problem.  It is not enough to just flush it out as you keep getting pieces of dislodged "tar" blocking things up.
Remove the tank and have it steam cleaned/hot tanked or whatever.. I have cleaned closed containers like fuel tanks with a shovel full of coarse river sand and small crushed rock as used in road building (beach sand is too smooth) some water and set it turning for a few days.  Hang it on a rotisserie used for turning sheep on a spit.  It sounds a bit agricultural but the same process is used in the preliminary polishing of gemstones.  We used to put them in a concrete mixer and tumble them till they become smooth.  The sand polishes up the inside.  You then need to coat the inside with something to inhibit rust.

With the Vanguard you have a ready source of parts from the TR enthusiasts, or as we did in days gone by tax free from the Ferguson tractor outlet.  All used the same 2 litre engine.  Does this make the TR the worlds fastest tractor??  :)

Some agressive solvent may dissolve the tar.  Perhaps acetone would work.  It is expensive stuff.  To clear out rust molasses works if you can give it a week or two to do its thing.

Keith



From: BBrick3513(at)aol.com
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 1:00 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

Hi Keith;
I have done about the same thing, but used a cement mixer, tied the tank to the front of the mixer, put flint rock & some water ( small pieces) in the tank.  I used a gas tank sealer after it was dried out.  Worked for me.

Bud Brick



From: Kenneth Nelson [citbuff(at)sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 1:06 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

What a great idea Bud a cement mixer!  I used the rocks also on a very rusty DS21 Citroen tank, but had to shake it manually talk about getting worn out!
But after rinsing & drying, I used POR15 gastank sealant, and it has worked perfectly for the last 17 years and about 75K miles.  That POR 15 is amazing when a drop of it hardened on my baseement cement floor, it was like ceramic never seen anything like it.

Ken



From: BBrick3513(at)aol.com
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 2:08 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

Ken:  I used PRO 15 also, and I'm with you, I think is is good stuff, I haven't used it for that many years, as you have, but maybe three or four years and no problems so far.

Bud Brick



From: importautosbdo(at)juno.com
Sent: Sunday, April 09, 2006 11:39 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [HillmanCars] advice

One advantage to having a radiator shop do the cleanout is that they get the fun of disposing of the rotten gas residue.  It is harder to find a radiator shop in So California who will do that any more because of the legal issues with the chemicals involved, but there is still one good shop in our area that does it.  We are seeing a lot of fuel contamination; partly because we are seeing a lot of cars that are being dragged out of barns and being put back on the road (or at least coming in with the hope of resurrection, but not always the money required).  In fact, checking out what's in the gas tank is right at the top of our list.
Linden

From: Tigerootes(at)aol.com
Sent: Monday, April 10, 2006 1:20 AM
To: HillmanCars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [HillmanCars] Re: advice, re: fuel tanks

I've posted this before but I think its worth saying again.

Years ago, Donn Anderson had a tank from one of his Rapiers boiled out at a radiator shop, but they didn't completely flush out their brine, before it dried inside.
After he reinstalled the tank, he added fuel and it turned into a foamy soap!

At the time he was infuriated, but he laughs about it these days...

Jim


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